Friday, October 31, 2014

Stint works hard for balanced feed

Getting 'balanced' diet hard for Red-necked Stint (Calidris ruficollis) holding injured leg close to body ... 


... good thing wings still work.


Nearby, Black-fronted Dotterel (Elseyornis melanops) takes one-leg rest.


And Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) tucks in. 


Elsewhere, Silver Gull (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae), unlike Stint, enjoys stretch of beach.

Monday, October 27, 2014

Metallic Starlings sterling condo builders

Construction by a labour force of about 200 Metallic Starling (Aplornis metallica) continues apace in their chosen two rain trees at the  western  end of Ingham's main shopping thoroughfare.

A spokesbird for the condo co-operative said work was on schedule and all performance targets were being met. 


'The team is doing starling, sorry, sterling work, as usual.' 

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Mungalla mob masses amid mud

Massed Egrets and Spoonbills crowd Mungalla Station wetlands for final feeding flurries before the shallows become fast-drying mud, probably  within a fortnight as the dry season intensifies.



Some migratory visitors are more than happy to see more mud. Pacific Golden Plover (Pluvialis fulva) numbers lower than in past seasons but starting to rise.



Also showing up to spend time on the mud, Red-capped Plover. Nonbreeding plumage gives only hints of the birds' breeding colours. 


From an earlier, rather colourless day, pair of White-browed Crake (Amaurornis cinerea) poke about among blue waterlilies. 

Monday, October 20, 2014

Shining moments with Flycatcher

Shining moments with Shining Flycatcher (Myiagra alecto) at two nest sides along tidal boundary at Mungalla Station this week.

Female doing most of building at one site...


...and feeding at the other.

Where's the male? He'll be along sometime, I hope.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Night drive proves owling success

Night drive west of Ingham proved an owling success with Eastern Grass-Owl (Tyto longimembris) and Eastern Barn Owl (Tyto javanica) found along 100-metre stretch of country road beside a cane field.

Dark female Grass Owl stood without concern as I gradually moved very close and didn't move away even when all light was taken off her.

Different story with Barn Owl. Fled its post after just a few quick shots from the cab of the Troopy.

And this male Grass Owl didn't hang around long when flushed in Tyto Wetlands the other morning. Recent sightings suggest last year's breeding pair in Tyto are not together right now. But their swamp ricegrass habitat is still too flooded for creation of grass tunnels and breeding sites.